Don’t want to be labelled obese? Obey the labels!

Having put together a nutritional diet for an ‘abs’ program, there’s little I don’t know about food labelling.  Much of that is thanks to the in-depth research necessary to turn the diet used as the basis for the program from the haute cuisine status it held, whilst delivering exactly the same results, into a Supermarket own-label branded diet (in the majority).

In fact, if you were to lay out the majority of everyday foods on a table, I’d be able to give you a rough approximation of the make up of each ingredient, fats, carbs, protein and any vitamin and/or mineral content, including sodium. Once you get to that stage, you begin to take it for granted that everyone else, similarly conscious of what they’re feeding their bodies (you so very are what you eat), at least shows a passing interest in what the packaging says about the food within. But apparently not.

That ever-popular editorial Agricultural Economics has recently issued this year’s results of the National Health Interview Survey in the US. It highlighted, for me, three main instances that could be directly addressed to tackle the epidemic of obesity spreading the globe (not to mention far too many waistlines), upon the crest of which rides the ever-growing problem of type two diabetes, even in younger adults.

The first, and for the woman looking for a quick fix to tackle their weight loss issues, is perhaps the one that is simplest to implement, is that women who don’t read food labels are an average 9lbs heavier than their content-querying counterparts. That’s like half a stone and then some!

Secondly, the annual study suggests that those who continued their education after compulsory schooling were more likely to consult the food labels than those who’d quit as soon as they were able.

And tertiary – portion control. Quite simply, if you don’t know how many calories, grams of saturated fat or nutritional content each meal contains, how on earth can you begin to serve up healthy options for you and your family?

All of this suggests that the education about food we receive falls way short and it’s often up to us as adults to go out into the world and learn even the basics of nutritional content that will help us live our lives to the full and engender our children to do the same.

There is plenty of further reading on here under the ‘healthy eating‘ tag, but why not do something about learning how to cook healthy and nutritious food yourself? We offer many regional cookery courses for you to compare. Check them out and see where you can get a hold of your nearest healthy-eating cookery class to kick-start your metabolism, hence your life. It is that serious.

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