Food Recycling will grow by teaching others better values

In the final article of this week’s topic, food recycling/food poverty, we visit one of the country’s most established organisations in that field, the Food AWARE Community Interest Company, associated with campaigns such as Healthy Start and its ongoing support of Love Food Hate Waste and the UK charitable outfit Chernobyl Children.

In itself, it is likewise a not-for-profit organisation and, in a similar vein to FoodCycle, our main topic on cookerycourses.co.uk this week, it relies on a combination of discarded food and volunteers but has had a little longer to establish itself and supports projects mainly in the north across Yorkshire and Humber.

What makes Food AWARE’s modus operandi ideal as the basis for a cookery course, amongst other aspects that we’ve dwelt upon using FoodCycle as an example through the week, is its focus on getting 5-a-day ingredients to those who may otherwise see no nutritious food on their plate.

This fits in perfectly with the amount of younger families that may be a) struggling to keep up with mortgage payments and therefore their budget for food is not as healthy as the diet they would prefer to eat and b) even if they did have fresh produce on their kitchen work surface, they would hardly know what to do with it, having been brought up on convenience food. It’s stating the obvious, but there is a very real need to address both.

As well as supporting many charitable organisations and community and church-led programs in the north, Food AWARE has a close affinity with Love Food Hate Waste, part of the wastewatch.org.uk scheme that has already committed to developing a 5-year diet program to encourage healthy eating, better for society as a whole – and thus the environment – and not only to get people to actually eat more wisely but have a very real appreciation of why the food they’re eating has both sustainable and planet-friendly values as well as delivering an overall more nutritious diet.

In summary of this week’s articles, all of the key issues are being addressed by organisations that are not in it for profit, which is great, but also limits their expansion and reaching a wider, more appreciative audience.

It needs more of the recognised food outlets, cookery courses and big brands to get behind these outfits to redistribute the food, yes, but in a way that people can learn to support themselves. These charities can then concentrate on growth, reducing the food surplus mountain and tackle poor nutrition in the less well-off regions of the country.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this week and learnt as much as I have; here are the links to the other four articles, just in case you missed any:
1. Monday
2. Tuesday
3. Wednesday
4. Thursday

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